US-WEATHER
People walk past the fountain at Bryant Park in New York on January 25, 2013 as the arctic air has turned the fountain into an ice sculpture. TIMOTHY A. CLARY—AFP/Getty Images

Here Are Photos of Frozen Fountains to Remind You How Cold It Is Everywhere in the U.S.

Jan 08, 2015

Unless you live somewhere where it's currently summertime, like Australia, you might have noticed that it's, um, cold. Really cold. Like, consider renouncing all your possessions and moving to Costa Rica and just somehow making it work cold.

One aesthetically pleasing result of this bitter weather, however, is that fountains across the country are freezing, resulting in oddly beautiful ice sculptures. See, for example, the fountain in New York City's Bryant Park:

But this bizarre phenomenon is also occurring in the South, where temperatures have also dipped well below 32°F:

Here's the obligatory frozen fountain post. Stay warm out there! #belmontgram

A post shared by Belmont University (@belmontu) on

Remember to bundle up, people.

(h/t Business Insider)

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