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2014 Was Officially the Hottest Year on Record

Statewide Drought Takes Toll On California's Lake Oroville Water Level
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images The Enterprise Bridge passes over a section of Lake Oroville that is nearly dry in Oroville, Calif., Aug. 2014.

And all 10 of the hottest years on record have come after 1998

Scientists have declared 2014 officially the hottest year on record.

The temperature data was released Monday by the Japan Meteorological Association (JMA), one of the four major global temperature record-keepers to do so. The other three are NASA and the NOAA in the U.S., and the Hadley Center in the U.K.

JMA’s preliminary data indicate that 2014’s global average surface temperature was the warmest since 1891, the start of the data. Specifically, it was 0.27°C (0.5°F) greater than that of the period from 1981 to 2010. With 2014 in the lead, the second hottest year on record is now 1998. Both 2013 and 2010 are tied for third, while 2005 is tied for fifth.

All 10 of the hottest years on record have come after 1998, which many scientists attribute to global warming, according to Scientific American.

In 2014, several regions in the world smashed their heat records. California hit record-high temperatures, inducing one of the worst drought’s in history. Australia also hit unprecedented high temperatures in January — and the continent’s so hot this year, too, that people are already frying eggs on sidewalks.

 

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