A young girls stands in the doorway of a house. A member of her family, 21 year old Fleuri Doumana, was killed two days earlier by a grenade launched by a member of Seleka. Bangui, Central African Republic.
A young girls stands in the doorway of a house. A member of her family, 21 year old Fleuri Doumana, was killed two days earlier by a grenade launched by a member of Seleka. Bangui, Central African Republic. Nov., 2013.William Daniels—Panos
A young girls stands in the doorway of a house. A member of her family, 21 year old Fleuri Doumana, was killed two days earlier by a grenade launched by a member of Seleka. Bangui, Central African Republic.
Displaced Muslims listen to a speech from the Minister of Reconciliation and the Imam after Friday prayers in the main mosque of the Muslim enclave of PK5 where about 700 Muslims are camping out in the yard of the mosque, Bangui, Central African Republic.
A young girls stands in the doorway of a house. A member of her family, 21 year old Fleuri Doumana, was killed two days
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William Daniels—Panos
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William Daniels Wins 2014 Tim Hetherington Grant

Dec 11, 2014

French photographer William Daniels, a frequent contributor to TIME, was named the 2014 recipient of the Tim Hetherington Grant by World Press Photo and Human Rights Watch on Thursday for his ongoing work in Central African Republic.

His project, titled "Roots of Africa's Unholy War," was chosen from 198 applicants. The annual honor, established after Hetherington, a British photojournalist and filmmaker died in April 2011 while covering the conflict in Libya, comes with a €20,000 prize that allows the recipient to continue a project focused on human rights issues.

Daniels has made several trips over more than a year to Central African Republic to document the effects of unprecedented violence after the Séléka coalition of mainly Muslim rebels seized power in March 2013. The move bred political chaos and ignited a vicious revenge from armed groups of predominantly Christian and animist fighters called anti-balaka. Last December, two days of street violence left hundreds dead around the capital, Bangui, and forced the global community to respond.

MORE: Bloodshed in Bangui: A Day That Will Define Central African Republic

Throughout the next year, deadly tension pushed much of the country's Muslim minority into the eastern region or beyond the borders. Rights groups warned of ethnic cleansing as French and African peacekeepers have struggled to contain the violence.

Daniels has balanced keeping up with the news while also investigating the roots of the conflict. The commitment he and other photographers have made to bearing witness — amid huge news draws like the war in eastern Ukraine, ISIS and wrath of Ebola in West Africa — was a main factor in keeping Central African Republic on the radar.

In September, Daniels received the Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography for the same work. Based in Paris, he has devoted his career to documenting humanitarian and social issues, from disease in Africa and Asia, to the unrest in Libya, to the aftermath of the devastating 2010 earthquake in Haiti.

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