Record Hot
An Indian commuter splashes water from a pipe onto his face to get respite from the heat at the railway station in Allahabad, India, on June 7, 2014 file photo  Rajesh Kumar—AP

Global Temperatures Are the Hottest on Record for a Fifth Month This Year

Nov 21, 2014

The world is heading for the warmest year on record with October the fifth month to break worldwide heat records.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced Thursday that the average global temperature for October was 58.43ºF (14.74ºC).

"It is becoming pretty clear that 2014 will end up as the warmest year on record," said Deke Arndt, chief of climate monitoring for NOAA's National Climatic Data Center. "The remaining question is: How much?"

This year, the world’s temperature is averaging 58.62ºF, (14.78ºC), already beating other hot years 2010 and 1998.

Arndt says man-made global warming is to blame. The burning of coal, oil and gas causes heat to be trapped in the earth's atmosphere. The world’s oceans absorb this heat and because of their size, are slow to cool down. Over the past six months the world's ocean temperatures have been their warmest on record.

Scientists say the year-on-year, decade-on-decade rise in global temperatures is proof that climate change is real and not slowing down.

"[This] is climate change, and we are seeing it in spades," Katharine Hayhoe, a climate scientist for Texas Tech, told the Associated Press.

The freezing temperatures and snowstorms in the U.S. won't have an affect on the heat records as the area experiencing the cold spell is just 1.5% of the entire globe.

In 2014, October, September, August, June and May all set global heat records.

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