Sudan Solar Eclipse
A partial solar eclipse is seen over the Sudanese capital Khartoum on November 3, 2013. Anadolu Agency—Getty Images

Look Up: There's a Rare Partial Solar Eclipse Thursday

Oct 23, 2014

As long as rainclouds aren't obstructing the view, people across the United States will be able to look up Thursday afternoon to witness the moon cover part of the sun in a rare partial solar eclipse.

According to Weather.com, nearly all of North America, barring part of Canada and New England, will be able to see the display. Sky and Telescope has a list of when the eclipse will be visible in different major cities. The partial solar eclipse will be viewable in New York beginning at 5:49 p.m. and peaking at 6:03, though skywatchers on the west coast will get the best show — the eclipse begins in Los Angeles at 2:08 p.m. and hit its peak midway point at 3:28 p.m. local time.

Here's a map that tracks eclipse visibility:

While there will be another partial solar eclipse Aug. 21, 2017, Business Insider reports there won't be another that is visible to the entire country until 2023. So maybe step outside — but take precautions.

"Looking directly at the Sun is harmful to your eyes at any time, partial eclipse or no," says Sky and Telescope's Alan MacRobert. "The only reason a partial eclipse is dangerous is that it prompts people to gaze at the Sun, something they wouldn't normally do. The result can be temporary or permanent blurred vision or blind spots at the center of your view."

[Sky and Telescope]

See the Astronomical League's Most Beautiful Photos from 2014

Rosette nebula, NGC 2237, taken from Waukesha, Wisc., on Jan. 6, 2014.
The Rosette nebula, also known as NGC 2237 or Caldwell 49, taken from Waukesha, Wisc., on Jan. 6, 2014.Dennis Roscoe, Ph.D.
Rosette nebula, NGC 2237, taken from Waukesha, Wisc., on Jan. 6, 2014.
The Elephant's Trunk Nebula, also known as IC 1396, on April 14, 2014.
The Pleiades, also known as M45 or the Seven Sisters, imaged from Fayetteville, Ark., on Jan. 25, 2014.
Andromeda Galaxy (M31), imaged from Fayetteville, Ark., on Jan. 19, 2014,
A time lapse showing star trails above Big Lagoon State Park in Pensacola, Fla., on March 30, 2014.
Eta Aquarid meteors above Bryce Canyon in Utah, in May 2014.
The Orion Nebula, taken from Waukesha, Wisc., on Feb. 7, 2014.
A star-forming nebula in Gemini, in January 2014.
Propeller Nebula in Cygnus, also known as DWB111, on May 1, 2014.
The Milky Way, taken from Pensacola Beach in Pensacola, Fla., on March 2, 2014.
An aircraft turns over the night sky with the Milky Way in the background above Santa Rosa Beach, Fla., on Jan. 5, 2014.
Pelican Nebula, taken from Waukesha, Wisc., on Jan. 9, 2014.
The Horsehead nebula, also known as Barnard 33 in emission nebula IC 434, taken at Seneca and Oswego in Illinois, Feb.-March 2014
A panorama of the Milky Way taken from Fall Creek Falls State Park during the Eta Aquarid meteor shower on May 4, 2014.
The Rosette nebula, also known as NGC 2237 or Caldwell 49, taken from Seneca, Ill., in March 2014.
The Pinwheel Galaxy, also known as Messier 101, M101 or NGC 5457, taken at the Winter Star Party in the Florida Keys on March 1, 2014.
The Milky Way with Venus rising at Pensacola Beach in Pensacola, Fla., on March 2, 2014.
Waxing Moon over Winter Garden, Fla., on Feb. 10, 2014
The Rosette nebula, also known as NGC 2237 or Caldwell 49, taken from Waukesha, Wisc., on Jan. 6, 2014.
Dennis Roscoe, Ph.D.
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