TIME Theme Parks

SeaWorld Is Drowning Fast

Trainers have Orca killer whales perform for the crowd  during a show at the animal theme park SeaWorld in San Diego, California
Trainers have Orca killer whales perform for the crowd during a show at the animal theme park SeaWorld in San Diego, on March 19, 2014. Mike Blake—Reuters

A damning documentary hasn't helped the struggling theme park

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This post is in partnership with Fortune, which offers the latest business and finance news. Read the article below originally published at Fortune.com.

By Ben Geier

On Friday, SeaWorld Entertainment announced that it is building new, bigger enclosures for its signature attractions — the orcas (also known as killer whales). Their jumps and tricks have delighted some, but their alleged poor treatment and inadequate habitats have enraged others.

The theme park company said it plans to upgrade the killer whale tanks at three of its theme parks, starting with the one in San Diego, Calif. The new orca tanks will be 50 feet deep and have a surface area of nearly 1.5 acres.

Will improved conditions be enough to reverseSeaWorld’s declining revenue? Earlier this week the theme park company said its revenue dropped 1 percent in the three months ended June 30 during a period that’s considered the company’s peak season. SeaWorld also attributed its poor quarter to bad press following the release of the “Blackfish” documentary, which accused the theme park operator of mistreating orcas.

Wall Street wasn’t impressed and sent the company’s stock price down over 30 percent.

For the rest of the story, please go to Fortune.com.

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