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Amazon’s Latest Is a Total Game-Changer

Amazon Readies Kindle Fire Update to Keep Up With Apple, Google
Jeff Bezos, chief executive officer of Amazon.com Inc., introduces the Kindle Fire HD tablet at a news conference in Santa Monica, California, U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 6, 2012. Patrick Fallon—Bloomberg/Getty Images

Here's what the company's big move means for a hot new technology

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This post is in partnership with Fortune, which offers the latest business and finance news. Read the article below originally published at Fortune.com.

Amazon.com isn’t just a place to get books, music and other products that roll off assembly lines or stream online.

Amazon said Monday that online shoppers will now be able to buy 3D printed products on-demand from a list of 200 different items like bobblehead dolls, miniature plastic swordsand pet ID tags. The technology lets people customize their orders beyond what has been previously been possible on the online retailing site including bobbleheads made to look like family and friends.

“The introduction of our 3D Printed Products store suggests the beginnings of a shift in online retail – that manufacturing can be more nimble to provide an immersive customer experience,” Petra Schindler-Carter, director for Amazon’s marketplace sales, said in a statement.

Amazon doesn’t actually handle the printing. Rather, it’s done by Mixee Labs, a company specialized in selling plastic 3D printed nicknacks. Products available through the partnership aren’t cheap. A 3D printed bobblehead costs $30 compared with versions made on an assembly line that cost around $12.

Moreover, anyone who wants speedy shipping is out of luck. Orders through Amazon for 3D products can take up to ten business days to fill.

For the rest of the story, please visit Fortune.com.

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