TIME Morning Must Reads

Morning Must Reads: July 7

Capitol
Mark Wilson—Getty Images The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC.

In the news: Ukraine military's remarkable transformation; NSA targeting; Why we stuck with Iraqi PM Nouri al-Maliki; Obamacare; The Highway Trust Fund; Hillary distances herself from the President; Bloomberg's gun control group

  • Ukraine Military Finds Its Footing Against Pro-Russian Rebels [NYT]
  • Why We Stuck With Maliki—and Lost Iraq [WashPost]
    • “Tony Blair has demanded a change of government in Iraq unless the Maliki regime abandons sectarianism.” [The Telegraph]
  • “Ordinary Internet users, American and non-American alike, far outnumber legally targeted foreigners in the communications intercepted by the National Security Agency from U.S. digital networks…” [WashPost]
  • Obamacare’s Next Threat: A September Surprise [Politico]
  • “Lawmakers are under pressure to refill the Highway Trust Fund when they return to Washington after the Fourth of July weekend or risk losing thousands of construction jobs that could set back recent job growth.” [Hill]
  • “Hillary Clinton has begun distancing herself from President Barack Obama, suggesting that she would do more to woo Republicans and take a more assertive stance toward global crises, while sounding more downbeat than her former boss about the U.S. economic recovery.” [WSJ]
  • “Bloomberg’s group, Everytown for Gun Safety, is asking all Senate and House incumbents and candidates to complete a 10-part questionnaire stating publicly where they stand on issues such as expanding background checks for gun buyers, limiting the capacity of ammunition magazines and toughening gun-trafficking statutes.” [WashPost]
  • A ‘Band-Aid’ for 800 Children [WashPost]
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