A view of South America and portions of North America and Africa from MESSENGER’s Dual Imaging System’s. The wide-angle camera records light at eleven different wavelengths, including visible and infrared light. The image above substitutes infrared light for blue light
A view of earth from MESSENGER’s Dual Imaging System. The wide-angle camera records light at eleven different wavelengths, including visible and infrared light. The image above substitutes infrared light for blue lightNASA
A view of South America and portions of North America and Africa from MESSENGER’s Dual Imaging System’s. The wide-angle camera records light at eleven different wavelengths, including visible and infrared light. The image above substitutes infrared light for blue light
This composite of 30 photos of theTarantula Nebula, contains data from Chandra (blue), Hubble (green), and Spitzer (red).  Located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, the Tarantula Nebula is one of the largest star-forming regions close to the Milky Way.
Working with astronomical image processors at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md., renowned astro-photographer Robert Gendler has taken science data from the Hubble Space Telescope archive and combined it with his own ground-based observations to assemble a photo illustration of the magnificent spiral galaxy M106.
Hubble’s 24th birthday shot of Monkey Head Nebula. This cloud of gas and dust lies about 6400 light-years away in the constellation of Orion. Nebulas like this one are popular targets for Hubble – their colorful plumes of gas and fiery bright stars create ethereally beautiful pictures.
The Corona Australis region (containing, at its heart, the Coronet cluster) is one of the nearest and most active regions of ongoing star formation. This composite X-ray and infrared image catches star formation in the act.
The bright southern hemisphere star, RS Puppis, is surrounded by reflective dust. Hubble took a series of photos of light flashes rippling across the nebula in a phenomenon known as a "light echo."
Astronomers used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to photograph the iconic Horsehead Nebula in an infrared light to mark the 23rd anniversary of the famous observatory's launch aboard the space shuttle Discovery on April 24, 1990.
Antennae Galaxies reloaded
This is a Hubble Space Telescope composite image of a supernova explosion in the galaxy M82. At a distance of approximately 11.5 million light-years from Earth it is the closest supernova of its type discovered in the past few decades.
Grand swirls
This is a compact star forming region in the constellation Cygnus. A newly-formed star called S106 IR is shrouded in dust at the centre of the image, and is responsible for the surrounding gas cloud’s hourglass-like shape and the turbulence visible within. Light from glowing hydrogen is coloured blue in this image.
The Antennae galaxies, located about 62 million light-years from Earth, are shown in this composite image. The X-ray image from Chandra shows huge clouds of hot, interstellar gas, which have been injected with rich deposits of elements from supernova explosions.
Two very different glowing gas clouds in the Large Magellanic Cl
NASA’s Sojourner robotic rover examining a boulder on Mars’s Chryse Planitia, as imaged by its parent spacecraft, Pathfinder, after landing on the planet on July 4, 1997. Parts of Pathfinder’s solar arrays and the rover’s down ramp are in the foreground.
A view of earth from MESSENGER’s Dual Imaging System. The wide-angle camera records light at eleven different wavelength
... VIEW MORE

NASA
1 of 14

Photos: It's Always the Fourth of July in Space

Jul 03, 2014

See the best red, white and blue photos from space to celebrate the Fourth of July.

All products and services featured are based solely on editorial selection. TIME may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website.