Scripps National Spelling Bee Ends With Two Champions

May 30, 2014

There were two winners of the Scripps National Spelling Bee on Thursday, with both Sriram Hathwar and Ansun Sujoe proving so formidable in National Harbor, Md., that organizers ran out of questions.

In the final round, Hathwar, a 14-year-old from Painted Post, N.Y., correctly spelled stichomythia — a dramatic dispute between two actors. Sujoe, a 13-year-old from Fort Worth, had no problem with feuilleton — a special supplement of a European newspaper.

"I think we both know that the competition was against the dictionary, not against each other," Hathwar told ESPN after the win. "I am happy to share this trophy with him."

"I was pretty happy when I made the finals, and now I'm even happier that I'm a co-champion," said Sujoe.

The result is the first tie at the event in half a century.

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Andrew Lay of Stanley, N.C. reacts after he correctly spelled the word "negus" during the 2007 Scripps National Spelling Bee on May 31, 2007 in Washington.Alex Wong—Getty Images
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