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This Chart Shows What Happened to Malaysia Airlines After Missing Flight

Military officer Nguyen Tran looks out from a Vietnam Air Force AN-26 aircraft during a mission to find the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, off Con Dao island, on March 14, 2014.
Military officer Nguyen Tran looks out from a Vietnam Air Force AN-26 aircraft during a mission to find the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, off Con Dao island, on March 14, 2014. Kham—Reuters

After reporting its fifth and largest quarterly loss in the wake of the disappearance of Flight 370, the air carrier vowed to cut costs and "win back" customers, even as ticket sales from China plunged by 60 percent in March

Malaysia Airlines’ net loss widened 59 percent in the first quarter to 443.4 million ringgit ($137.8 million), as the company vowed to win back customers after the disappearance of Flight 370.

Malaysia2
Source: Malaysia Airlines

The company staggered into 2014 with its fifth and largest quarterly loss since the disappearance of the flight two months ago.

Already pinched by climbing fuel costs and an unfavorable foreign exchange, the carrier said ticket sales from China plunged by 60 percent in March.

Roughly two-thirds of the passengers on board Flight 370 were Chinese, and news coverage has focused heavily on distressed family members in Beijing.

The company acknowledged the expanding fallout of the tragedy, saying, “Winning back customers and a relentless cost focus will be part of the airlines’ Recovery plan.”

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